Walnuts For Diabetes

05wellwalnuts-tmagArticleEating walnuts may reduce the risk for Type 2 diabetes in women, a large new study concludes.

Previous studies have suggested an inverse relationship between tree nut consumption and diabetes. Though the findings are correlational, walnuts are uniquely high in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which may be of particular value in Type 2 diabetes prevention.

The scientists, writing in the April issue of The Journal of Nutrition, used dietary and health data on 138,000 women participating in a large continuing study of women’s health. Beginning in 1999 they collected data on walnut consumption, and followed the women for the next 10 years. They found 5,930 cases of Type 2 diabetes.

Women who ate walnuts tended to weigh less, consume more fish and exercise more than those who did not. But researchers controlled for these and many other factors, and found that compared with women who ate no walnuts, those who consumed 8 ounces of walnuts or more a month reduced their risk for Type 2 diabetes by 24 percent.

“There’s been a lot of research on nuts in general in relation to cardiovascular health,” said the senior author, Dr. Frank B. Hu, a professor of medicine at Harvard. “This is the first on walnuts and diabetes. Walnuts may have some unique benefits.”

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Precautions For Managing Diabetes

Diabetes and Your Diet

slide01-manage-bloodsugarIt’s no secret that diet is essential to managingtype 2 diabetes symptoms. While there is no cure-all diet that is perfect for everyone, dietary choices are important in keeping your blood sugar level in the safe range.

Click through this slideshow to learn about how nuts, fruits, vegetables, carbohydrates, starches, proteins, sugars, fats, and other nutrients and foods can help or hurt high blood sugar(hyperglycemia).

The Basics of Blood Sugar Control

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which the body doesn’t make enough insulin. This can cause high blood sugar and symptoms such as:

  • fatigue
  • blurred vision
  • increased appetite
  •  thirst
  • urination

The normal blood sugar range for diabetics, as determined by the American Diabetes Association, is between 70 and 130 mg/dL before meals and less than 180 mg/dL a few hours after you began eating. You can use a blood sugar monitor to check your blood glucose levels and adjust your diet or medication accordingly.

 

Low-Fat Diet

Foods that are high in sodium, saturated fats, cholesterol, and trans fat can elevate your risk for heart disease and stroke. However, that doesn’t mean that you have to avoid all fats. Foods rich in good fats—monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat—can help lower cholesterol levels, according to the Harvard School of Public Health.

Try replacing the meat on your plate with omega-3 fatty acid-rich cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, and herring. Olive oil, avocado, and nuts are also good sources of this nutrient.

Foods to Avoid:

  • red meat
  • bacon
  • processed foods

high-fat dairy products like cheese

Fruits and Vegetables

 

Balancing carbohydrates, fats, and sugars is integral to a diabetes-friendly diet. While processed and refined carbs are bad for you, whole grains and dietary fiber (good carbs) are beneficial in many ways. Whole grains are rich in fiber and beneficial vitamins and minerals. Dietary fiber helps with digestive health, and helps you feel more satisfied after eating.

 

Foods to Eat:

  • leafy green vegetables
  • nuts
  • whole grains
  • low-fat dairy products
  • beans and peas
  •  fresh low-sugar fruits (blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, cranberries, pears, cantaloupes, grapefruit, and cherries)

Foods to Avoid: high-sugar fruits like watermelon, pineapple, raisins, apricots, grapes, and oranges.

Starches

Starches are another type of food your body converts into blood glucose. They not only provide a source of energy but also vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Whole grain starches are the healthiest because they maximize nutrition and break down into the bloodstream slowly. The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse recommends at least one serving of starch at every meal.

Foods to Eat: whole grain versions of bread, pasta, cereal, rice, crackers, and tortillas

Foods to Avoid:

  • potato chips
  • packaged snacks
  • candy bars

When to Eat

If you have diabetes, you should eat smaller meals throughout the day to avoid unnecessary spikes in your blood glucose level. However, your body requires more sugars and carbohydrates during exercise, so eat before and after a workout.

Your age, weight, height, level of exercise, and other factors also affect your diet. Monitor and record your blood glucose level in response to food and create your own personal diabetes diet with the help of your doctor or dietitian.

 

Losing Weight

Losing a few extra pounds will not only help your self-esteem, but also lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels and improve blood pressure.

Regular exercise combined with a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products can help you lose. Talk to your doctor about an exercise plan that is safe for you and any other steps you can take to improve your health.

 

More Diabetes Information

At times, living with type 2 diabetes can seem like a challenge, but sticking to a routine and finding a proper diet are the basics of managing your diabetes. Carefully inspecting the sodium, sugar, and carbohydrate levels in packaged food is also important.

Your doctor, a nutritionist, and a dietitian are all vital members of your diabetes management team. It’s important to track your blood glucose levels in relation to what you eat and your insulin treatment regimen (if you have one).

In time, you’ll get to know how your body responds to different foods at different times of the day.

 

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Diabetes Diet For Diabetics Peoples

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For diabetics, a healthy diabetes diet is the essenceto healthy living along with exercise, of course.

 

 

 

But what makes up a diabetes diet for Indians? There are several diabetes diets published online, which include exotic ingredients and food items. But what about ingredients that are locally available to Indians with diabetes? Let’s get a diabetes diet for Indians from the experts in nutrition and diabetology.

Diabetologist, Dr. Sanjiv Bhambani with Moolchand Medcity suggests “A diabetes diet should be high on fiber, must contain milk without cream, buttermilk, fresh seasonal fruits, green vegetables, etc.” But remember to consume these components in moderation.

Diabetes diet for Indians should have the ratio of 60:20:20 for carbs, fats and proteins, the doctor explains, “Per day calorie intake should be between 1,500-1,800 calories with a proportion of 60:20:20 between carbohydrates, fats and proteins, respectively.” He adds that a diabetes diet should “have at least two seasonal fruits and three vegetables in a diet plan.” As for dry fruits, the fructose can spike up your sugar level.

The doctor shares his recipe for diabetes Diet:
– One teaspoon of methi seeds soaked overnight in 100 ml of water is very effective in controlling diabetes.
– Drink tomato juice with salt and pepper ever morning on an empty stomach.
– Intake of 6 almonds (soaked overnight) is also helpful in keeping a check on diabetes.

We move now to nutritionist Rekha Sharma to look for elaborate answers to diabetes diet for Indians. Rekha Sharma, President and Director of Indian Dietetic Association shares some major diabetes diet pointers that one should follow at home or at a restaurant.

Expert speak: Diabetes Diet.

Whole grains, oats, channa atta, millets and other high fiber foods should be included in the meals. If one feels like consuming pasta or noodles, it should always be accompanied with vegetable /sprouts.

Milk is the right combination of carbohydrates and proteins and helps control blood sugar levels. Two servings of milk in a daily diet is a good option.

High fiber vegetables such as peas, beans, broccoli and spinach /leafy vegetables should be included in one’s diet. Also, pulses with husk and sprouts are a healthy option and should form a part of the diet.

Pulses are important in the diet as their effect on blood glucose is less than that of most other carbohydrate containing foods. Vegetables rich in fiber help lowering down the blood sugar levels and thus are healthy.

Good fats such as Omega 3 and MUFA should be consumed as they are good for the body. Natural sources for these are canola oil, flax seed oil, fatty fish and nuts. These are also low in cholesterol and are trans fat free.

Fruits high in fiber such as papaya, apple, orange, pear and guava should be consumed. Mangoes, bananas, and grapes contain high sugar; therefore these fruits should be consumed lesser than the others.

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Study Highlights Five Keys To Diabetes Prevention

110905020100-active-adults-story-topWould you be willing to change one aspect of your life — such as eating healthier or exercising more — if you knew it would reduce your likelihood of developing diabetes? Would you make two, three or five lifestyle changes to bring down those chances even more?

Every little bit helps, a new government study suggests. Meeting just one of five key health goals reduces your odds of developing diabetes in middle age by roughly one-third, the study estimates, and the more goals you meet, the lower your risk falls, even if you have a family history of diabetes.

Doctors, of course, have long known that bad habits such as smoking, drinking too much and eating unhealthy foods increase the likelihood of developing an array of chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

But the new study — the largest of its kind to date — is among the first to explore how several healthy habits combine to affect diabetes risk.

“The question we were trying to raise is whether there are added benefits to each individual lifestyle improvement you make, and it looks like that answer is definitely yes,” says Jared Reis, Ph.D., the lead author of the study and an epidemiologist with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. “The strength of the association was really very dramatic and quite surprising.”

Reis and his colleagues analyzed data from more than 200,000 men and women in eight states who are part of a long-running study on diet and health led by the National Cancer Institute. In the mid-1990s, when they ranged in age from 50 to 71 and showed no signs of serious illness, the study participants answered detailed questionnaires about their diet, lifestyle, medical history, physical characteristics and demographic profile.

Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes

Ten years later, roughly 9% of the men and women had developed diabetes. Those who were least likely to receive a diabetes diagnosis shared five key health attributes:

Normal weight. They were not overweight or obese, and maintained a body mass index below 25 (a threshold equivalent to 155 pounds for a 5-foot, 6-inch woman).

Nonsmoking. They had never been regular smokers, or they’d been smoke-free for at least 10 years.

Physically active. They got at least 20 minutes of heart-pounding, sweat-inducing exercise three or more times per week.

Healthy diet. They consumed a diet with lots of fiber, little trans fat, few refined or sugary carbohydrates, and a high ratio of good (polyunsaturated) to bad (saturated) fats.

Little to no drinking. They used alcohol in moderation, if at all — two drinks or less a day for men, and one drink or less for women.

Each additional attribute was associated, on average, with 31% and 39% lower odds of developing diabetes among men and women, respectively. People who met all five standards had roughly 80% lower odds of a diabetes diagnosis than demographically similar people who led less healthy lifestyles, according to the study, which was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Of all five lifestyle factors, being overweight was linked most strongly to diabetes risk. But having healthy marks for the other four factors still made a difference in overall risk, regardless of whether a person was normal weight, overweight or obese.

“It isn’t always an easy thing to lose weight and to maintain that weight loss over the long term,” Reis says. “So this is good news for those individuals who have a tough time losing weight: You can still lower your risk with these other lifestyle changes.”

25 ways to cut 500 calories a day

With questionnaire-based studies like this one, there’s always a chance that the participants don’t accurately report their behavior, or that the results are skewed by health and lifestyle factors that the researchers haven’t taken into account.

But in this case, the study’s large, real-world population — as opposed to the smaller, strictly monitored groups typically found in clinical trials — may actually be a strength, says Robert Henry, M.D., the president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association, an advocacy organization based in Alexandria, Virginia.

“This study looked at factors we know can be easily modifiable, and the conditions that people actually live with in real life,” says Henry, who is also a professor of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of California-San Diego. “And it does that better than some of the diligently done clinical trials that may not be applicable to a normal lifestyle situation.”

Small diet and exercise tricks that get big results

The study also found that maintaining the five lifestyle factors lowers diabetes risk regardless of family history, suggesting that people with a genetic predisposition can still prevent or at least delay the onset of the disease.

“Some people will say, ‘I’m too overweight for this to have any value,’ or ‘I’m doomed because diabetes runs in my family,’ but we see here that’s not true,” says Henry, who was not involved in the study. “Even if you’re obese, even if you have family history, this shows that there are real benefits to living a healthy lifestyle.”

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Diabetes Without Drugs

If you have type 2 diabetes, you can manage it well without any drugs — without any oral medications and without insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will always have to take insulin injections, but you can likely use less than you do now.

To manage diabetes well means keeping your blood sugar level down in the same range as that of people who don’t have diabetes. The way we check this level is the A1C (sometimes called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, or HbA1c). This test tells you what your average blood sugar level was during the previous two or three months by using a drop of blood about as small as that you use on your regular fingerstick tests that tells you what your level is right then.

When you manage your diabetes well, it is well controlled. It is normal. We know that the normal A1C level is 6.0 or below. See “The Normal A1C Level.”

An A1C level of 6.0 or below means that your diabetes is in remission. It does not mean that you have cured it. If you relax your vigilance, your A1C level will go above 6.0 again, and you will again put yourself at risk of the terrible complications of uncontrolled diabetes.

You can use drugs to bring your A1C level down to normal. That’s a good thing. But this strategy does have its costs, and those costs aren’t just money out of your pocket or your checkbook. The worst of those costs are the potential side effects of the drugs.

imagesAll drugs can have side effects. The systems and the organs of our bodies are so interconnected that no drug can target just one part of it without having some effect elsewhere. Sometimes we find that the side effects are helpful, but we can also find that they are harmful. Sometimes they are subtle and affect only a few people, but sometimes they are serious.

All of the drugs that we take to manage our diabetes are known to or are suspected of having some serious side effects in some people. That’s the price most of us are willing to pay.

But some of us think we have a safer strategy of managing our diabetes without drugs. Back in 2007 I joined this group with the encouragement of a good friend of mine who is a Certified Diabetes Educator. Before that, I had 14 years of experience taking a wide range of diabetes drugs, including two different sulfonylureas (Diaßeta and Amyrl), Glucophage (metformin), and Byetta. For the past six years I haven’t taking any diabetes drugs, and yet I keep my diabetes in control with an A1C level usually about 5.4.

I had to make three big changes in my life when I went off the diabetes drugs, and they are hard at first. But now they are a routine part of my life, and I would never go back to my old ways. The changes that I had to make are those that almost everyone who has diabetes has to make. In order of importance, I had (1) to lose weight, (2) eat fewer carbohydrates, and (3) exercise more.

Any lifestyle changes this fundamental are difficult, first because a body at rest tends to remain at rest, as Sir Isaac Newton proved more than 300 years ago. I wrote here about both the down side and the up side of “Overcoming Exercise Inertia,” but inertia is just as big a factor in losing weight and in eating wisely.

But we have another difficulty at first when we shift our metabolism from getting our energy from carbohydrates to getting it from fats, the only choice we have. A very low-carb diet necessarily means a high-fat diet, and the transition from carb-burning to fat-burning for energy can make us feel weak for a couple of weeks, as I wrote in “It’s Low-Carb Weak.”

Those are hurdles we all have to cross in making the transition to managing our diabetes without drugs. Is it worth the effort?

For me, my answer is an unequivocal yes, and I feel confident that it will be for you, if you are not managing your diabetes well or even if you are managing it well while using a diabetes drug or two or three. The systems of our bodies are so interrelated that when we manage our diabetes well, we get a positive side effect that spills over into our general well-being.

ARTICLE SOURCE: This factual content has not been modified from the source. This content is syndicated news that can be used for your research, and we hope that it can help your productivity. This content is strictly for educational purposes and is not made for any kind of commercial purposes of this blog.

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

images (1)Eating well is a great way to stay healthy during pregnancy. If you have gestational diabetes, choosing the right food is especially important. You may be able to control gestational diabetes by eating well and exercising regularly. This means you won’t need to take medication.

Sugar (glucose) is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Your body uses a hormone called insulin to control the amount of sugar in your blood and to turn it into fuel. But pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more to be able to use any sugar in your blood.

If you have gestational diabetes, your body isn’t producing enough insulin. As a result, your blood sugar levels can get very high and that can lead to problems for your baby.

It’s possible to keep your blood sugar levels under control by changing what you eat and combining your new healthy diet with regular exercise. In fact, up to 90 per cent of women with gestational diabetes control it this way.

How will I have to change my diet?

If you were overweight before you got pregnant, your doctor or midwife will advise you to monitor your calorie intake. They’ll also suggest that you take at least 30 minutes’ moderate exercise, such as walking or swimming, every day.

You’ll need to be careful that you don’t have sharp rises and falls in your blood sugar levels. Your doctor should help you with this. Ask her to arrange an appointment with a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. The special diet will guide you on:

  • which foods you should and shouldn’t eat
  • how much you should be eating
  • how often you should eat

Although the idea of a special diet may sound daunting, it’s not so hard once you get the hang of it. The principles of the diabetic diet are good ones for everyone to follow. Try to think of this as a chance to get yourself and your family into healthier eating habits.

I’ve heard about good carbs and bad carbs. What are they?

There are two types of carbohydrate that give you energy when you eat them. They are:

  • complex carbohydrates, or starch
  • simple carbohydrates, or sugars

Sometimes, complex carbohydrates are described as good carbs, and simple carbohydrates as bad. But this doesn’t give the whole picture.

Simple carbohydrates include added sugars, such as table sugar and honey, as well as natural sugars, found in fruit and milk. Eating plenty of fruit and some dairy products is a healthy thing to do. So when people call simple sugars bad carbs, they are talking about added sugars.

If you have gestational diabetes and you have too many foods and drinks high in added sugars, it can upset your blood glucose control. It’s not healthy for people without diabetes, either.

At least half the energy in our diets should come from carbohydrate, mostly as starchy carbohydrates. Starchy carbohydrates are:

  • bread
  • rice
  • pasta
  • grains
  • potatoes

Try to have wholegrain varieties where possible. They provide extra fibre, which is important for your digestion.

If you have gestational diabetes, the types of food and drink you’ll be advised to have are no different from the type of healthy diet everyone should have. Your food should be high in complex carbohydrates and low in saturated fat.

You should not have added sugars, although you won’t have to cut them out completely.

It’s best if you eat fruit, milk and yoghurts as part of a mixed meal. Your body will then absorb the simple sugars in the juice or dairy food more slowly. That’s because the sugars are mixed with other food elements, such as fibre and protein.

What are low GI foods and why are they important?

The glycaemic index (GI) of a food is a measure of how quickly sugar (glucose) is released into your bloodstream after you’ve eaten it. Low-GI foods that are rich in fibre are an important part of a healthy diet.

Choosing foods with a low GI will help you to manage your gestational diabetes. That’s because low-GI foods take longer for your body to digest. Glucose is released more slowly into your bloodstream.

Some examples of food with a low GI:

  • pasta made with durum wheat flour
  • apples, oranges, pears, peaches
  • beans and lentils
  • sweetcorn
  • porridge

Some examples of food with a high GI:

  • baked potato
  • cornflakes
  • white rice
  • bread

Choosing more foods with a low GI may be able to help you to control your blood sugar levels. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t have any high-GI foods. Mixing high-GI foods with low-GI foods can lower the rate at which glucose is released into your bloodstream. Examples of foods that combine well in this way are:

  • peanut butter on toast
  • baked potato with baked beans

Your doctor or dietitian can give you more information on choosing a healthy diet.

How can I improve my diet?

Eat a good breakfast

Eating a good breakfast can help regulate your blood sugar levels throughout the morning. Try to have a low-GI breakfast. Porridge is a good choice because it releases energy slowly and evenly. Or you could choose wholegrain cereals and breads with a small portion of a high-protein food such as a boiled egg or a low-fat yoghurt.

High GI foods such as sugar-coated cereals or white toast and jam can quickly raise your blood sugar levels.

Eat a variety of foods during the day

Across your day, try to have plenty of variety so that your food is interesting and appealing. Sometimes it helps to use colour to help you achieve this. If the food on your plate is made up of foods that are only brown or yellow, try adding in some red pepper and green salad or some raspberries and grapes, depending on whether or not it is a savoury meal.

Eat high-fibre foods

Eat plenty of high-fibre foods. These foods tend to have a low GI. This may help to keep your blood sugar levels from going too high after meals. High-fibre foods include:

  • fresh fruit and vegetables
  • wholegrain breads and cereals
  • dried peas, beans and pulses

Eat your five a day

Make sure you have at least five portions of fruits and vegetables each day:

  • add fruit to your breakfast cereals or porridge
  • add a salad to your lunchtime sandwich
  • choose two vegetables with your main meal
  • snack on fruit rather than biscuits or cakes

Cut down on saturated fats

  • use unsaturated fats, such as olive oil or sunflower oils for cooking and salad dressings
  • replace butter with a spread high in polyunsaturated fats
  • grill foods instead of frying
  • snack on nuts and seeds, rich in unsaturated fats, instead of milk chocolate
  • trim fat from meats

Don’t skip meals

Try to eat balanced meals at regular intervals each day and have the same amount of food at each one. Eat three small to moderate-sized meals every day. Using a smaller dinner plate can help you keep an eye on your portion sizes. You can also eat between two and four snacks, including an after-dinner snack to help keep your blood sugar levels steady.

This will help your blood sugar to stay more stable.

Cut down on sugary foods and drinks

Try to cut down, or give up, sweets, fizzy drinks, fruit juice, and most desserts. These foods contain simple sugars that are easy for your body to absorb. They can quickly raise your blood sugar.

You can dilute fruit juices with water. Use about one quarter juice to three quarters water, and drink once a day. The rest of the time, opt for water and other drinks without sugar, such as sugar-free squashes and flavoured drinks.

What if I can’t control gestational diabetes by diet alone?

Remember that exercise helps too, so try to keep active. Every time you exercise it helps to lower your blood sugar levels.

Fast walking, swimming, cycling, or even going up and down the stairs are all good ways of increasing your heart rate. Before starting any new exercise, check what you’re planning to do with your doctor or midwife. The key is to avoid being still for long periods of time, such as sitting at a desk or watching TV for hours on end.

If diet and exercise aren’t enough to keep you well, you may need to take medication to control your blood sugar levels or to inject insulin.

Your doctor will teach you how to inject yourself. This may sound a bit scary, but by keeping your blood sugar levels under control you’ll be doing your best to keep yourself and your baby well.

ARTICLE SOURCE: This factual content has not been modified from the source. This content is syndicated news that can be used for your research, and we hope that it can help your productivity. This content is strictly for educational purposes and is not made for any kind of commercial purposes of this blog.

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

With some extra care and attention, you may prevent type 2 diabetes.

Type-2-diabetes-prevention (1)Type 2 diabetes prevention is possible by adopting some healthy lifestyle habits and paying attention to specific preventable diabetes complications associated with the disease. Some steps for prevention include adopting a healthy lifestyle and taking diabetes medication , if needed. Many doctors recommend screening for type 2 diabetes at age 30 among people at risk, such as those with a family history of diabetes or who are overweight.

Healthy Lifestyle Habits to Prevent Diabetes

type-2-diabetes-preventionFirst, certain diabetes risk factors like age, family history, and ethnicity cannot be changed. However, changing other risk factors by eating a healthier diet and increased physical activity — with or without weight loss — may help prevent type 2 diabetes.

In addition, if you have high blood pressure or are overweight, modifying lifestyle habits may help prevent type 2 diabetes. Your doctor can make specific recommendations that are right for you including diet changes and specific exercises. Medications to help you quit smoking, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure also help reduce the risk of complications.

A study done by the Harvard School of Public Health and published in The New England Journal of Medicine found that being overweight and obese was the single most important risk factor that predicted who would develop type 2 diabetes. During a 16 year follow-up period, study results showed that regular exercise — at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week — and an improved diet that’s low in fat and high in fiber significantly helped with type 2 diabetes prevention. The bottom line: type 2 diabetes prevention could be as easy as adopting healthy lifestyle habits.

 In another study, the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study Group, researchers tested the effects of weight loss, diet, and exercise on type 2 diabetes prevention in more than 500 people who were overweight and also had pre-diabetes or borderline diabetes with an impaired oral glucose tolerance test. They concluded that with changes geared at weight loss and improving physical activity levels, people at high risk of developing diabetes could reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes by more than 50%.

Medication’s Role in Diabetes Prevention

New research shows that medications may help prevent the progression to type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose tolerance — and not just in controlling type 2 diabetes once you have it. There are several different studies that show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can reduce the risk of developing diabetes in a high-risk person.

One clinical trial, called the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), showed that people who have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes (borderline diabetes or pre-diabetes) could reduce that risk by 31% when using the prescription diabetes drug Metformin alone with lifestyle and diet changes. While this is significant, the NIH study also showed that the risk of diabetes could be reduced even further — by 58% — through intensive lifestyle changes alone (specifically, nutrition and exercise counseling). Participants in the study had blood sugar levels that were higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be considered diabetes. This health condition, called pre-diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), often precedes diabetes if intervention is not done early.

ARTICLE SOURCE: This factual content has not been modified from the source. This content is syndicated news that can be used for your research, and we hope that it can help your productivity. This content is strictly for educational purposes and is not made for any kind of commercial purposes of this blog.

Diabetes, Type 2 – Treatment

Treating type 2 diabetes

There is no cure for diabetes, so treatment aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and to control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life.

images (1)

 

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition to you in detail and help you to understand your treatment. They will closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur.

If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team.

Care standards for diabetes

In treating diabetes, the aim is to help people with the condition control their blood glucose levels and minimise the risk of developing future complications.

The Department of Health has set out national standards for NHS organisations and professionals covering diabetes care and prevention. The diabetes national service framework was developed by diabetes clinical experts and patients with diabetes. Good diabetes care includes:

  • awareness of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes
  • advice and support to help people at risk of type 2 diabetes reduce that risk
  • access to information and appropriate support for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including access to a structured education programme, such as DESMOND (Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed) or X-PERT Health.
  • an agreed care plan, helping all people with diabetes to manage their care and lead a healthy lifestyle, including a named contact for their care
  • information, care and support to enable all people with diabetes to optimise their blood glucose level, maintain an acceptable blood pressure and minimise other risk factors for developing complications
  • access to services to identify and treat possible complications, such as screening for diabetic retinopathy and specialised foot care
  • effective care for all people with diabetes admitted to hospital, for whatever reason.

Lifestyle changes

images (2)For many people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the first approach to treatment is to make lifestyle changes. These include taking regular exercise, eating healthily and losing weight if you are overweight or obese (a body mass index of 30 or over).

This may be enough to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other treatment.

Taking medicines

Type 2 diabetes usually gets worse over time. Even if they work at first, diet and exercise may not be enough to control your blood glucose levels.

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may need, or eventually need, medicines that reduce high levels of blood glucose. Initially, this will usually be in the form of tablets, and may sometimes be a combination of more than one type of tablet. It may also include insulin or other medication that you inject.

 

ARTICLE SOURCE: This factual content has not been modified from the source. This content is syndicated news that can be used for your research, and we hope that it can help your productivity. This content is strictly for educational purposes and is not made for any kind of commercial purposes of this blog.

Milk — Good or Bad for Diabetes?

milk-glass-101105-02Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves.

ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page.

USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say?

Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author ofThe Blood Sugar Solution, wrote,

I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.

OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway?

What Milk Is Made Of
Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations.

Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various minerals, and vitamins A, B complex, C, D, K, and E.

What could be wrong with that? Let’s look a little more closely.

Milk Protein Linked to Type 1 Diabetes?
There are four different types of casein proteins, called alpha-S1, alpha-S2, beta, and kappa caseins. Other milk proteins are called “whey” proteins.

A variant of beta-casein known as A1 beta-casein has beenimplicated in causing Type 1 diabetes. In genetically vulnerable children, A1 beta-casein may set off an immune response that later turns against the beta cells in the pancreas.

Children who drink cow milk have been found more likely to develop Type 1 later on. Other scientists say this evidence is weak and thestudies were flawed. I think children should be kept off cow’s milk formulas at least until their first birthday.

Milk Fat
The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) defines a serving of dairy as 8 ounces of nonfat or low-fat milk or yogurt.

This low-fat advice appears unsupported by science. Most of the good stuff in milk is in the fats. According to Wikipedia, “the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K along with essential fatty acids such as linoleic and linolenic acid are found within the milk fat portion of milk.”

Some evidence supports milk fat as being protective against Type 2 diabetes. A study published in the December 2010 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine followed 3,736 men for 10 years and found that those who had the highest blood levels of a type of fatty acid from whole-fat (not nonfat) dairy foods had 60% less chance of developing Type 2 diabetes than men with the lowest levels.

As one of the authors commented, “This is an extremely strong protective effect, stronger than other things we know can be beneficial against diabetes.”

Several other studies have demonstrated that dairy consumption lowers risk for insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, or diabetes. Researchers credit a fatty acid found in dairy products, trans-palmitoleic acid as the possible protective compound.

In various studies, higher levels of trans-palmitoleic acid were associated with numerous desirable outcomes: lower body-mass index, smaller waist circumference, lower triglyceride levels, lower levels of C-reactive protein (a marker of inflammation), lower fasting insulin levels, and less insulin resistance.

Milk Sugars
Milk sugar is called lactose. Lactose gives milk its sweet taste and contributes approximately 40% of whole cow’s milk’s calories.

Lactose can definitely raise your blood glucose. An enzyme called lactase splits it up into glucose and galactose. Because this split takes time, some nutritionists say lactose converts to blood glucose relatively slowly (that is to say, it has a low glycemic index or GI).

But others say that dairy may have a low GI but stimulates insulin as if it had a high GI. Loren Cordain, PhD, of Colorado State Department of Health and Exercise Science, believes this may be due to thecombination of lactose and some of the amino acids in whey proteins.

Cordain, author of The Paleo Answer, says the insulin response to milk is “extreme,” and advises people concerned about diabetes to avoid milk products.

It’s hard to reconcile the supposedly healthful affects of dairy fat with the supposedly harmful effects of dairy sugar. Should we drink it or not?

Different Kinds of Milk
There are other milks besides human and cow. Goat milk is gaining popularity. Camel milk is said by many to be extremely nutritious. It’s now for sale in the US. Vegan milks include soy milk, rice milk, and almond milk.

You might consider buying either free-range, grass-fed organic milk or using a vegan alternative. According to Discovery Health, milk cows are given hormones to increase their milk production and antibiotics to decrease infections. Neither of these is good to eat.

Lactose Intolerance
People who don’t have sufficient lactase to digest lactose will be “lactose intolerant,” and may suffer diarrhea, intestinal gas, cramps, and bloating from drinking milk.

It is estimated that 30 to 50 million Americans are lactose intolerant, including up to 75% of Native Americans and African-Americans, and 90% of Asian Americans.

Lactose-free or reduced lactose milk is available. It has been treated with lactase to break lactose down, so it doesn’t cause abdominal problems. It is sweeter than regular milk and has a higher glycemic index.

ARTICLE SOURCE: This factual content has not been modified from the source. This content is syndicated news that can be used for your research, and we hope that it can help your productivity. This content is strictly for educational purposes and is not made for any kind of commercial purposes of this blog.

5 Precautions For Taking Control On Diabetes

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it’s never too late to start. Consider these tips.

diabatescoveredg_600x450When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It’s especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you’re at increased risk of diabetes, for example, if you’re overweight or have a family history of the disease.

Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds — and it’s never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association.

Tip 1: Get more physical activity

There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you:

  • Lose weight
  • Lower your blood sugar
  • Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range

Research shows that both aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes, but the greater benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both.

Tip 2: Get plenty of fiber

It’s rough, it’s tough — and it may help you:

  • Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control
  • Lower your risk of heart disease
  • Promote weight loss by helping you feel full

Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts and seeds.

Tip 3: Go for whole grains

 Although it’s not clear why, whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and many cereals. Look for the word “whole” on the package and among the first few items in the ingredient list.

Tip 4: Lose extra weight

 If you’re overweight, diabetes prevention may hinge on weight loss. Every pound you lose can improve your health, and you may be surprised by how much. Participants in one large study who lost a modest amount of weight — around 7 percent of initial body weight — and exercised regularly reduced the risk of developing diabetes by almost 60 percent.

Tip 5: Skip fad diets and just make healthier choices

 Low-carb diets, the glycemic index diet or other fad diets may help you lose weight at first, but their effectiveness at preventing diabetes isn’t known nor are their long-term effects. And by excluding or strictly limiting a particular food group, you may be giving up essential nutrients. Instead, think variety and portion control as part of an overall healthy-eating plan.

When to see your doctor

 If you’re older than age 45 and your weight is normal, ask your doctor if diabetes testing is appropriate for you. The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening if:
  • You’re age 45 or older and overweight
  • You’re younger than age 45 and overweight with one or more additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes — such as a sedentary lifestyle or a family history of diabetes

Share your concerns about diabetes prevention with your doctor. He or she will applaud your efforts to keep diabetes at bay, and perhaps offer additional suggestions based on your medical history or other factors.

 

ARTICLE SOURCE: This factual content has not been modified from the source. This content is syndicated news that can be used for your research, and we hope that it can help your productivity. This content is strictly for educational purposes and is not made for any kind of commercial purposes of this blog.